Designer vs. Developer

After years of letting the business group – with input from the customer – decide how the UI of your applications look like, you finally get a proper UI designer. He has taken several courses in UI design, usability, accessibility and several other -ilities. He’s super fast with Photoshop, can crank out a ‘quick mock-up’ during your design call and you are generally very excited as a developer that at last your product, your baby, on which you’ve spent countless hours and written thousands of lines of code, will finally ‘look’ nice.

It starts off great! Your first few meetings go well with the UI designer. You are excited by the ‘look and feel’ and the ‘consistency’ and the ‘ease of use’ of your product. You actually end up saying something like this to your manager, ‘You know John, bringing in a UI designer is one of the best things to happen to our team’. That’s the first positive thing you’ve said about your team in 3 years and 9 months.

Then the application development begins.

Like Kim Kardashian’s fake marriage, your relationship with the UI designer begins to crumble. He wants a ’rounded’ drop down. You know your IDE doesn’t support that. He wants a ‘tree’ structure. You complain it’s going to be a performance hit. You talk code, he talks art. You sit in your little cubicle coding your brains out, he comes back from a week long seminar in Copenhagen to lecture you on the ‘latest trends in UI design’. It keeps getting harder and harder.

Isn’t there a middle ground?

There’s no real short answer to that question. Well, yes there is. The short answer is No!

The primary difference is that he is paid to make your product look great. You are paid to make your product work. There was only one person in this world who could put both in one package but he died of pancreatic cancer last year.

The key is patience. Developers are programmed to think ‘logically’. Designers are not. The first step is to make them understand the business. Half of them come with lofty ideas that fall flat because they are totally unsuited for your business. So making them understand the business, the key elements, and especially the limitations is a key step. Failing this, your relationship is headed for divorce.

That is the easy part. The tough part is to make them understand the limitations of the programming platform you’ve chosen. Snazzy tools cost a lot to buy (and more to maintain the license). Open source tools are generally crappy in the flair department. But as said before, the key is to be patient. Don’t expect the UI person to understand everything upon the first conflict resolution. They need to be nurtured, and the limitation you mentioned in the team meeting yesterday, you need to repeat it today and Monday and the next month as well.

On the other hand you need to understand that he’s trying to make ‘your’ ugly product look better. In the process covering up some of the obvious flaws. Give him some credit. You’ll end up being happy and sleeping peacefully.

BTW, I have not met a ‘he’ UI designer so far.

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