The H1B Damage

I have to put up two disclaimers before starting this post:

  1. If you’re an Indian person offended by my opposition to the H1B program, don’t read further. Get out!
  2. What I write below does not apply to everyone. You know who you are.

The H1B program was instituted to bring in some the super-skilled, extremely talented, smart individuals to help out businesses in this country.

Every nation faces some resource crunch or the other from time to time. Wealthy nations face it more. They usually have a thriving economy, businesses ringing in profits quarter after quarter, products being released in a hurry but unable to push the R&D required to keep pace with development. The US has long had such requirement in various fields, mostly engineering related: automotive, industrial, construction and lately, computer science and information technology.

The candidates who are foreign nationals and otherwise not legally allowed to work in the US, usually have advanced engineering (or other) degrees, giving them the ability to analyze and solve complex problems. Most of the original H1Bs were foreign students who studied in US colleges for their degrees and went on to find a job to apply the knowledge they obtained.

That was how it was, until the turn of the last century. Some time in the late 90s and early 00s the game changed. Silicon Valley required hundreds of thousands of such people as technology leaped from its industrial confines into our homes. In order to build these amazing gadgets software companies needed programmers. With the education system in the US already on a downward spiral, it was much easier (and cheaper) to bring people from foreign countries to do the programming work for us.

Problem is, some of the companies entrusted with the job of finding the talent began to circumvent the rules. They brought in less deserving candidates using fake experience, and sometimes faking the candidates themselves in to this country. We ended up with tens of thousands of truly undeserving candidates learning on the job. They do a good job at work. It’s outside of the work that the damage happened.

Undeserving candidates, several of whom come from socially reckless backgrounds invaded the American society. These people usually pay no attention to culture, following rules or adapting to customs. Having come from generally underprivileged background back in their home country, they would splurge on cars, homes and other gadgets with their nouveau-riche status here in the US. It resulted in an unusual bloating of prices, culminating in the housing bubble that left everyone in the lurch. They may not be the single most reason behind the bubble, but their contribution is unmistakeable.

It has also resulted in a general soft-corner towards illegal immigration. See, if you are an undeserving candidate yourself, you’re more likely to condone an immigrant who just walked in without papers, rather than the righteous individual who earned his keep.

Another damage being constantly done to the American society – and one of my pet peeves – is the lack of assimilation. I could go on and one about the refusal to adopt new customs but I’ve already covered that enough.

There needs to be “extreme vetting” of the H1B program. Raising the minimum salary for H1Bs is not the answer. Businesses have to scrutinize every single hire (direct, temp, third party or even consultants) and make sure the candidates justify their position. Once you’ve identified the candidate is meritorious, maybe put them through some psychological evaluation to tune them to the American society and culture. Maybe even pay for the ‘Americanization’ of such candidates.

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